English PEN 100

We’re delighted to announce English PEN 100 (24–26 September 2021) at the Southbank Centre,  a three-day programme on themes of literature, exile, free expression, translation, activism, and solidarity, drawn from English PEN’s rich history of protecting writers and readers across the world.

English PEN 100 will feature:

– Writers, activists, and thinkers including Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Elif Shafak, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Fatima Bhutto, Temi Oh, Hassan Blasim, Max Porter, Margaret Busby, Joelle Taylor, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Edmund de Waal, Philippe Sands, Ellah P. Wakatama, Sasha Dugdale, Daniel HahnXiaolu Guo, Georgina Godwin, Margie Orford, Nadifa Mohamed, Tice Cin, So Mayer, Kit de Waal, Tade Thompson, Ahdaf Soueif, Meena Kandasamy

– An outdoor digital artwork by artist Ai Weiwei created for English PEN’s centenary

– An evening of new work on themes of sisterhood and solidarity commissioned for English PEN’s centenary, hosted by Mona Arshi and curated by Rachel Long.

Founded in 1921, English PEN – one of the world’s oldest human rights organisations – marks its 100th anniversary with the year-long programme, Common Currency. The three-day English PEN 100 festival at the Southbank Centre, also part of Common Currency, brings together renowned and emerging writers, readers and activists for timely debates and discussions. The themes of the programme, inspired by the PEN Charter, include free speech and democracy, language and ideas, and a celebration of women.

To open the festival, bestselling author and PEN Pinter Prize 2018 winner Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie will reflect on her writing, including her latest book Notes on Grief (24 Sep, RFH). In Why Toni Morrison Matters, Margaret Busby, Tsitsi Dangarembga and Nadifa Mohamed will explore the legacy of the visionary writer (25 Sep, QEH). Continuing the focus on women’s voices, Margie Orford, Ahdaf Soueif and Fatima Bhutto will discuss the PEN Women’s Manifesto and the founder of PEN, Catherine Amy Dawson Scott, a trailblazer for equality between genders in a literary world dominated by men (25 Sep, QEH).

The PEN movement has worked with writers forced into exile for many decades, creating ‘in exile’ centres across the world. To explore what it means to live and write in exile, acclaimed authors Xiaolu Guo, Hassan Blasim, and Edmund de Waal will be in conversation with broadcaster Georgina Godwin (25 Sep, PUR). Continuing this exploration of borders, language and ideas, writers Sasha Dugdale, Meena Kandasamy, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and Daniel Hahn will consider the possibility and limits of international writing, decolonising literature, and the politics of translation (26 Sep, PUR).

100 years from the inception of PEN, many events will focus on the future of writing and free expression, including an evening of specially commissioned new writing hosted by Mona Arshi and curated by Rachel Long (25 Sep, PUR); a discussion with Temi Oh, Tade Thompson, and Ellah P. Wakatama on the visionary powers of sci-fi (26 Sep, PUR); and Tice Cin, So Mayer, Max Porter, Kit de Waal and Joelle Taylor on the importance of solidarity and literary activism (26 Sep, QEH). On the final evening of English PEN 100, President of English PEN and human rights lawyer Philippe Sands will be joined by PEN Pinter Prize 2021 winner Tsitsi Dangarembga, writer and academic Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, and author Elif Shafak to reflect on free expression and writing, in their own work and across the world (26 Sep, QEH).

Ted Hodgkinson, Head of Literature and Spoken Word, Southbank Centre said:

We’re delighted to welcome English PEN, one of the world’s oldest human rights organisations, for a festival that celebrates a century of great writing and the abiding relevance of their courageous campaigning. With English PEN 100, we reflect on the pivotal role the organisation played for women writers in the UK, for free expression globally, and for readers and writers everywhere. As the Southbank Centre reopens its doors, we invite you all to join us for a lively and illuminating weekend with some of the world’s most exciting writers.

Daniel Gorman, Director, English PEN said:

For the past 100 years, English PEN has championed freedom of expression and literature across the world. This year, as we mark our centenary, we explore and expand on the founding themes of the organisation: language and ideas crossing borders, free speech and democracy, and a celebration of women’s voices. We’re thrilled to welcome some of the world’s greatest writers for an ambitious programme at the Southbank Centre that will continue conversations, ideas, debates that we hope will inspire the next 100 years.

Hannah Trevarthen, Events and Partnerships Manager (Centenary), English PEN said:

We’re thrilled to take our Common Currency centenary celebrations to the Southbank Centre for a three-day programme in which we will explore the rich history of PEN together with a diverse range of writers, activists, and thinkers. The programme will draw on PEN’s work over the past 100 years protecting writers and readers across the world, with a particular focus on writing in exile, writing in translation, and elevating women’s voices.

Booking information:

10% discount for English PEN Members..

Special offer: 25% off when buying tickets to 3 or more events.

For more information on the season please visit the Southbank Centre website here.

We’re delighted to announce English PEN 100 (24–26 September 2021) at the Southbank Centre,  a three-day programme on themes of literature, exile, free expression, translation, activism, and solidarity, drawn from English PEN’s rich history of protecting writers and readers across the world.

English PEN 100 will feature:

– Writers, activists, and thinkers including Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Elif Shafak, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Fatima Bhutto, Temi Oh, Hassan Blasim, Max Porter, Margaret Busby, Joelle Taylor, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Edmund de Waal, Philippe Sands, Ellah P. Wakatama, Sasha Dugdale, Daniel HahnXiaolu Guo, Georgina Godwin, Margie Orford, Nadifa Mohamed, Tice Cin, So Mayer, Kit de Waal, Tade Thompson, Ahdaf Soueif, Meena Kandasamy

– An outdoor digital artwork by artist Ai Weiwei created for English PEN’s centenary

– An evening of new work on themes of sisterhood and solidarity commissioned for English PEN’s centenary, hosted by Mona Arshi and curated by Rachel Long.

Founded in 1921, English PEN – one of the world’s oldest human rights organisations – marks its 100th anniversary with the year-long programme, Common Currency. The three-day English PEN 100 festival at the Southbank Centre, also part of Common Currency, brings together renowned and emerging writers, readers and activists for timely debates and discussions. The themes of the programme, inspired by the PEN Charter, include free speech and democracy, language and ideas, and a celebration of women.

To open the festival, bestselling author and PEN Pinter Prize 2018 winner Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie will reflect on her writing, including her latest book Notes on Grief (24 Sep, RFH). In Why Toni Morrison Matters, Margaret Busby, Tsitsi Dangarembga and Nadifa Mohamed will explore the legacy of the visionary writer (25 Sep, QEH). Continuing the focus on women’s voices, Margie Orford, Ahdaf Soueif and Fatima Bhutto will discuss the PEN Women’s Manifesto and the founder of PEN, Catherine Amy Dawson Scott, a trailblazer for equality between genders in a literary world dominated by men (25 Sep, QEH).

The PEN movement has worked with writers forced into exile for many decades, creating ‘in exile’ centres across the world. To explore what it means to live and write in exile, acclaimed authors Xiaolu Guo, Hassan Blasim, and Edmund de Waal will be in conversation with broadcaster Georgina Godwin (25 Sep, PUR). Continuing this exploration of borders, language and ideas, writers Sasha Dugdale, Meena Kandasamy, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and Daniel Hahn will consider the possibility and limits of international writing, decolonising literature, and the politics of translation (26 Sep, PUR).

100 years from the inception of PEN, many events will focus on the future of writing and free expression, including an evening of specially commissioned new writing hosted by Mona Arshi and curated by Rachel Long (25 Sep, PUR); a discussion with Temi Oh, Tade Thompson, and Ellah P. Wakatama on the visionary powers of sci-fi (26 Sep, PUR); and Tice Cin, So Mayer, Max Porter, Kit de Waal and Joelle Taylor on the importance of solidarity and literary activism (26 Sep, QEH). On the final evening of English PEN 100, President of English PEN and human rights lawyer Philippe Sands will be joined by PEN Pinter Prize 2021 winner Tsitsi Dangarembga, writer and academic Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, and author Elif Shafak to reflect on free expression and writing, in their own work and across the world (26 Sep, QEH).

Ted Hodgkinson, Head of Literature and Spoken Word, Southbank Centre said:

We’re delighted to welcome English PEN, one of the world’s oldest human rights organisations, for a festival that celebrates a century of great writing and the abiding relevance of their courageous campaigning. With English PEN 100, we reflect on the pivotal role the organisation played for women writers in the UK, for free expression globally, and for readers and writers everywhere. As the Southbank Centre reopens its doors, we invite you all to join us for a lively and illuminating weekend with some of the world’s most exciting writers.

Daniel Gorman, Director, English PEN said:

For the past 100 years, English PEN has championed freedom of expression and literature across the world. This year, as we mark our centenary, we explore and expand on the founding themes of the organisation: language and ideas crossing borders, free speech and democracy, and a celebration of women’s voices. We’re thrilled to welcome some of the world’s greatest writers for an ambitious programme at the Southbank Centre that will continue conversations, ideas, debates that we hope will inspire the next 100 years.

Hannah Trevarthen, Events and Partnerships Manager (Centenary), English PEN said:

We’re thrilled to take our Common Currency centenary celebrations to the Southbank Centre for a three-day programme in which we will explore the rich history of PEN together with a diverse range of writers, activists, and thinkers. The programme will draw on PEN’s work over the past 100 years protecting writers and readers across the world, with a particular focus on writing in exile, writing in translation, and elevating women’s voices.

Booking information:

10% discount for English PEN Members..

Special offer: 25% off when buying tickets to 3 or more events.

For more information on the season please visit the Southbank Centre website here.

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